Organizations & Other Resources

Organizations

ASERVIC is an organization of counselors and human development professionals who believe spiritual, ethical, and religious values are essential to the overall development of the person and are committed to integrating these values into the counseling process.

The Global Alliance for a Deep-Ecological Social Work (GADESW) is intended as an educational resource and support forum for social workers attentive to the well-being of the earth community and concerned about environmental degradation.

The International Association of Schools of Social Work, IASSW, is the worldwide association of schools of social work, other tertiary level social work educational programmes, and social work educators. The IASSW promotes the development of social work education throughout the world, develops standards to enhance quality of social work education, encourages international exchange, provides forums for sharing social work research and scholarship, and promotes human rights and social development through policy and advocacy activities.

The International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) is a global organization striving for social justice, human rights and social development through the promotion of social work, best practice models and the facilitation of international cooperation.

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the world, and works to enhance the professional growth and development of its members, to create and maintain professional standards, and to advance sound social policies.

Out of its firm commitment to social justice and by virtue of the Catholic mission of our sponsors, St. Catherine University and University of St. Thomas, the social work faculty has looked to Catholic Social Teaching as a rich resource to inform and further specify social justice goals of social work education and practice.

Other Resources

Refer to the sections under the name of each document to find content related to spirituality       (i.e. terms such as spirituality, religion, beliefs).

National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics (NASW, USA)

  • 1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity
  • 4.02 Discrimination
  • 6.04 Social and Political Action

NASW Standards for Cultural Competence, 2001

  • Introduction, p.8
  • Cultural Competence, p. 11
  • Standard 4 Cross-Cultural Skills

NASW Peace Policy Toolkit, 2007

  • Numerous allusions to religion and spirituality

Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards, 2008 (CSWE, USA)

  • Educational Policy 2.1.4—Engage diversity and difference in practice
  • Educational Policy 2.1.7—Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment
  • Educational Policy 3.1—Diversity

Country specific Social Work Codes of Ethics

The following list includes English language Codes of Ethics from various countries if they contain terms related to spirituality such as beliefs, creed, faith, religion, religious, spiritual, and spirituality.

Australia

  • 5.1.1. Respect for human dignity and worth (b)
  • 5.1.2. Culturally competent, safe and sensitive practice (b, d, k)
  • 5.1.3. Commitment to social justice and human rights (b)
  • 5.1.5. Commitment to practice competence (f)
  • 5.1.7. Conflicts of interest (a)
  • 5.2.2. Client self-determination (c)
  • 5.3.    Responsibilities to colleagues (k)
  • 5.4.1. Service provision (h, j)
  • 5.5.1. Education, training, supervision and evaluation (m)

Canada

  • Value 3: Service to Humanity

Israel

  • Chapter 1. A: The Social Worker’s Responsibility towards Client
  • Chapter 3. A: The Social Worker’s Behavior by Virtue of Social Responsibilities

New Zealand

  • 2.1. Responsibility to the wider community
  • 3.    Responsibility to clients

Russia

  • 4.1. Acceptance of the person as he is
  • 5.2. Ethical behaviour in relation to people which use social services

Singapore

  • A. Social workers’ ethical responsibility to clients (7)
  • D. Social workers’ ethical responsibility as professionals and to the social work profession. (6)

South Korea

  • 1.1.2) Code of Conduct as Professionals

Switzerland

  • 9. 4. Obligation to reject discrimination
  • 8.9.7. Principle of integration

United Kingdom

  • 2.2.1 Challenging discrimination
  • 2.1.4 Treating each person as a whole
  • 3.7    Empowering people

South Africa

  • 5.3.1 Respect (b)
  • 5.5.3 Public emergencies (d), (e)
  • 4.1. Social Justice

In USA, see state specific social work licensure standards


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times
KU Today